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the Opposing Viewpoints database and click here to access the page where the Academic Search Complete database is found.
At least one of your three sources should present a counterargument*, a position an opponent of your argument might make.
Be sure to test all of your sources using the C.R.A.A.P. method.
Constructing Your Annotations
As you work on your annotations, remember to refer to the assignment guidelines and rubric (click here) to make sure you’re fulfilling each aspect of the assignment. You can also download/print the rubric.
Your responses will be saved to the Notebook, which can be found under the “Course Tools” menu. You can also download all of your responses to a single Word document by following the directions at the bottom of this page.
Click on each of the following tabs to begin building your annotations for your three sources.
Source #1
Source #2
Source #3

Submitting Your Annotations
Now that you have answered all of the questions above, click on the “Download Word Document” link below. When you open the Word document, you will see all of your responses from the questions above saved and collated in the document

Source #1
Step 1: Select a source from the Opposing Viewpoints database.
Step 2: Apply the C.R.A.A.P test to the source to determine if it is credible and reliable. Click here to download a copy of The C.R.A.A.P. Test Worksheet. Remember, credible sources should score 35 points or more on the test.
The next activity uses a rich text area. You can tab to the editor body. Press ALT-F10 to get to the toolbar. Press ESC to return to the editor body. A save button is available in the top toolbar all the way to the right and will become visible when it receives focus.
Step 3: Identify your source in the box below. Step 4: Fill in the blanks below to generate the summary portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentences into the textboxes.
It seems this source is arguing ____________________.
This source is using this evidence to support that argument: ____________________.
Step 5: Fill in the blank below to generate the credibility portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentence into the textbox.
Personally, I believe (the source is doing a good job/bad job of supporting its arguments and why) ____________________.
Step 6: Fill in the blanks below to generate the relevance portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentences into the textboxes.
My problem is ________________________.
This is my intended argument: ________________________.
I think this source will be very helpful in supporting my argument because ________________________.
I think this source will support my other sources because ________________________. Source #2
Step 1: Select a source from the Opposing Viewpoints database.
Step 2: Apply the C.R.A.A.P test to the source to determine if it is credible and reliable. Click here to download a copy of The C.R.A.A.P. Test Worksheet. Remember, credible sources should score 35 points or more on the test.
The next activity uses a rich text area. You can tab to the editor body. Press ALT-F10 to get to the toolbar. Press ESC to return to the editor body. A save button is available in the top toolbar all the way to the right and will become visible when it receives focus.
Step 3: Identify your source in the box below.
Step 4: Fill in the blanks below to generate the summary portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentences into the textboxes.
It seems this source is arguing ____________________.
This source is using this evidence to support that argument: ____________________.
Step 5: Fill in the blank below to generate the credibility portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentence into the textbox.
Personally, I believe (the source is doing a good job/bad job of supporting its arguments and why) ____________________.
Step 6: Fill in the blanks below to generate the relevance portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentences into the textboxes.
My problem is ________________________.
This is my intended argument: ________________________.
I think this source will be very helpful in supporting my argument because ________________________.
I think this source will support my other sources because ________________________.
Source #3
Step 1: Select a source from the Opposing Viewpoints database.
Step 2: Apply the C.R.A.A.P test to the source to determine if it is credible and reliable. Click here to download a copy of The C.R.A.A.P. Test Worksheet. Remember, credible sources should score 35 points or more on the test.
The next activity uses a rich text area. You can tab to the editor body. Press ALT-F10 to get to the toolbar. Press ESC to return to the editor body. A save button is available in the top toolbar all the way to the right and will become visible when it receives focus. Step 3: Identify your source in the box below.

Step 4: Fill in the blanks below to generate the summary portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentences into the textboxes.
It seems this source is arguing ____________________.
Step 5: Fill in the blank below to generate the credibility portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentence into the textbox.
Personally, I believe (the source is doing a good job/bad job of supporting its arguments and why) ____________________.
This source is using this evidence to support that argument: ____________________. Step 6: Fill in the blanks below to generate the relevance portion of your bibliography entry. Type the completed sentences into the textboxes.
My problem is ________________________.
This is my intended argument: ________________________.
I think this source will be very helpful in supporting my argument because ________________________.
I think this source will support my other sources because ________________________.

 

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